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Buzzing: Holiday movies, HPV, kids’ headphones, eczema, and the ultimate birth announcement

 

How to distract the kids from that Elf on the Shelf

Watch the wonderful wintry tale The Snowy Day, now a 40-minute animated show, and a new animated feature, If You Give a Mouse a Christmas Cookie.

They’re the first Amazon Video holiday originals for kids. Watch the trailers here.

Some Snowy Day trivia:

  • The book won the Caldecott Medal for best picture book in 1963.
  • It was the first mainstream children’s book with an African-American main character.
  • Its author, Ezra Jack Keats, was white.
  • Kids can play fun online games based on the book at the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation page.

The cheapest eczema treatment ever

It’s Vaseline. Early studies in several countries suggest that applying the sticky stuff to a baby’s entire body daily for the first six to eight months can help prevent eczema in high-risk cases. Several other kinds of moisturizer might also work (studies are ongoing) but good old petroleum jelly is the cheapest.

How to tell if your kid’s headphones are safe

If your questions can still be heard when you’re an arm’s length away, they’re working as they should, says Jim Battey, the director of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. A new analysis by the product-testing site Wirecutter found that half of the 30 children’s headsets they checked didn’t restrict volume as promised. Of course, we all know being heard and being listened to are two completely different things.

Why you might be hearing less about HPV from your doctor

A new study has found that vax rates for HPV immunizations go up when doctors simply make a brief announcement that assumes parents are ready to vaccinate their 11- and 12-year-olds. That’s opposed to having a conversation built on the idea of shared decision-making. The Pediatrics study still encourages docs to discuss the pros and cons if parents bring up questions. But the announcement route saves them time and is more likely to end in a jab.

If Joseph had posted the big news on Instagram…

We like the three wise dudes.

Photos from top: The Snowy Day/Amazon; John Mayer/Flickr; Wirecutter; Steven Depolo/Flickr; Modern Nativity/Shopify

By | 2017-09-05T08:18:39+00:00 December 8th, 2016|Baby, Grade-schooler, Preschooler, Teen, Toddler, Tween|

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